Statistics on Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer, as of 2015, affected about 3.4 million people globally with 430,000 new cases a year.[1] In 2015 it resulted in 188,000 deaths.[2] Age of onset is most often between 65 and 85 years of age.[3] Males, usually being more toxic, are more often affected than females.[3] In the United States in 2018 81,000 cases and 17,000 deaths are expected making it the 6th most common type of cancer in the region.[Ibid]

Globally, in 2010, bladder cancer resulted in 170,000 deaths up from 114,000 in 1990.[4] This is an increase of 19.4%, adjusted for increase in total world population.

According to the National Cancer Institute, 68,810 new cases of bladder cancer were reported in the US in 2008, out of which 14,100 have already died.

In the United States, bladder cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women. More than 50,000 men and 16,000 women are diagnosed with bladder cancer each year. Smoking can only partially explain this higher incidence in men.[5] 

According to conventional oncology, one other reason is that the androgen receptor, which is much more active in men than in women, may play a major part in the development of the cancer.[6]

Bladder cancer is the seventh most common cancer in the UK (around 10,400 people were diagnosed with the disease in 2011), and it is the seventh most common cause of cancer death (around 5,200 people died in 2012).[7]

 

References

  1.  GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence, Collaborators. (8 October 2016). “Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015″. Lancet. 388 (10053): 1545–1602. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31678-6. PMC 5055577. PMID 27733282.
  2. GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death, Collaborators. (8 October 2016). “Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015″. Lancet. 388 (10053): 1459–1544. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(16)31012-1. PMC 5388903. PMID 27733281.
  3. “Cancer of the Urinary Bladder – Cancer Stat Facts”. seer.cancer.gov. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 18 July 2017.
  4. Lozano, R; et al. (15 December 2012). “Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010″. Lancet. 380 (9859): 2095–128. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61728-0. PMID 23245604
  5. Hemelt M, Zeegers MP (2000). “The effect of smoking on the male excess of bladder cancer: a meta-analysis and geographical analyses”. Int J Cancer. 124 (2): 412–9. doi:10.1002/ijc.23856. PMID 18792102
  6. “Scientists Find One Reason Why Bladder Cancer Hits More Men”. University of Rochester Medical Center. 20 April 2007. Archived from the original on 11 January 2009. Retrieved 20 April 2007
  7. “Bladder cancer statistics”. Cancer Research UK. 14 May 2015. Archivedfrom the original on 17 October 2014.

 

 

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